RNY Gastric Bypass

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Roux-en-y (RNY) Gastric Bypass Surgery Checklist

As you consider your options regarding the treatment of obesity, you are most likely encountering several surgical options. The most common technique used today is the Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass method. Below is a checklist regarding this technique, and you should contact a cosmetic surgeon for more specific information as it relates to your condition.

Background of RNY Gastric Bypass Surgery
The background of Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass surgery goes back several years, and although this was not the first technique invented, it has become the most common technique used by bariatric surgeons around the world.

Best Candidates for Gastric Bypass Surgery
The best candidates for Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass surgery are those people with a BMI of at least 40, and have been obese for at least five years. The best candidates will also have no history of alcoholism or any psychological disorders that could impede the progress this surgery will make in a patient.

Uncertainty and Risk of RYNY Gastric Bypass Surgery
There is uncertainty and risk involved with any surgery, and specific risks associated with this procedure include infections and bleeding near the incisions, nutrient deficiency after the surgery and dumping syndrome, which occurs when food is not properly digested and causes the patient to feel flu-like symptoms. These complications, however, are statistically rare.

Planning for RNY Gastric Bypass Surgery
Planning for surgery involves just that – carefully planning for the details surrounding your surgery with your doctor to ensure a successful procedure. Generally, planning for surgery involves making sure that you’re going to have enough time to recover and that you understand the commitment needed to follow through with this process.

Preparing for Gastric Bypass Surgery
Preparing for surgery involves more of the “medical” steps necessary to maximize your surgical results. Specifically, preparing for surgery involves a full pre-op evaluation and a psychological check to make sure that the patient is ready and willing to undergo the lifestyle change that this procedure entails.

Where Gastric Bypass Surgery is Performed
Where surgery is performed is a standard answer. Given the complicated and invasive nature of this procedure, it is almost always performed at the hospital to make sure that resources are available immediately should any complications arise.

How Gastric Bypass Surgery is Performed
How surgery is performed is also quite standard. In this type of procedure, the stomach is made smaller by creating a small pouch near the top of the stomach. This is done by using either staples or a plastic band, and this “new” stomach is attached to the middle portion of the small intestine.

Anesthesia associated with Gastric Bypass Surgery

Anesthesia is always used in this surgery, and given the level of invasiveness this procedure entails, general anesthesia is administered. This means that the patient will not be awake while the surgery is completed.

Post-Op Considerations

Post-op considerations with this surgery are extensive in nature. Basically, your stomach will now be smaller, which means that you’ll have to change your diet and be diligent in your after-care follow-up, as this surgery is the beginning, rather than the end of your fight against obesity.

Roux-en-y (RNY) Gastric Bypass Surgery Candidacy

If you’re looking for options to fight your obesity, chances are you’ve come across several different procedures during your research. The most common form of bariatric surgery today is the Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass surgery, and questions many patients have regarding their candidacy for this procedure include, “How can I tell if I’m a good candidate for a Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass?”, “How will I be evaluated for Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass?” and “Will my insurance help offset the costs of Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass surgery?” Each of these questions is answered below, but for more specific details, you need to contact a cosmetic surgeon for a consultation.

How can I tell if I’m a good candidate for a Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass?

Generally speaking, the best candidates for this procedure are those prospective patients with a BMI of at least 40 and at least five years of obesity. These patients should also not have any history of alcoholism or psychological disorders that could be the actual cause of this obesity. Most patients have also attempted at least one other weight-loss method without success.

How will I be evaluated for Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass?

Your pre-surgical evaluation will be quite thorough. Your doctor will perform a full medical history analysis to attempt to trace possible causes of your obesity. You will also be checked for any other disorders that could either relate to or impede your chances for success after the surgery is complete. You’ll also be evaluated for any psychological factors that could affect the outcome of this procedure.

Will my insurance help offset the costs of Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass surgery?

This is a complicated question, and thereby involves a complicated answer. In general, insurance companies will cover procedures that are medically necessary. Whether this surgery is medically necessary will involve the recommendations of your doctor and the determination of necessity by your insurance company. Therefore, you’ll need to see your doctor for a recommendation and then work with your insurance company to come to a conclusion as to whether this surgery is necessary or merely elective. Elective surgeries are generally not covered.

Overall, three of the most common questions patients have in regards to their candidacy for Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass surgery are, “How can I tell if I’m a good candidate for a Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass?”, “How will I be evaluated for Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass?” and “Will my insurance help offset the costs of Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass surgery?” Each of these questions can be answered in general terms, but for specific facts and strategies that relate directly to your personal situation, you should start by contacting a medical professional for a full consultation.

Roux-en-y (RNY) Gastric Bypass Surgery Specifics

As you consider your options for fighting obesity, you’ll need to understand different procedures and the specific steps involved with each. As you look closely at Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass surgery, you’ll need to answer the following questions as they relate to the techniques: “Where are incisions placed for a Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass procedure?”, “What are some variations to the common Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass method?” and “What are some of the risks associated with Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass?” Each of these questions is answered below.

Where are incisions placed for a Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass procedure?

In a “traditional” procedure, an open incision is used on the patient’s abdominal area. This incision is relatively large and is isolated to this area of the body, as the surgeon will want to provide the surgical team direct access to the stomach. This direct access not only reduces the possibility of complications arising from the surgery itself, but also from the incision.

What are some variations to the common Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass method?

Although there is debate as to whether this technique should be called a “variation” any longer, the most common variation to the open incision method is the laparoscopic method. This technique involves a much smaller incision than the open technique, and the instruments used are much smaller. The surgeon also uses a camera to guide these instruments and to complete the procedure. This cuts down on complications arising from the incision itself and allows for a statistically shorter recovery time.

What are some of the risks associated with Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass?

The risks associated with Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass surgery are statistically rare, but they do need to be considered. The more general risks involved with any surgery relate to the incisions, as infections and bleeding can result. Specifically, risks associated with this procedure include problems absorbing nutrients and dumping syndrome, which occurs when ingested food is not properly digested. The result of this dumping syndrome is that the patient experiences flu-like symptoms and other nutritional problems. However, with the vigilant after-care programs that exist, these problems are often minimized quickly.

Overall, three of the most common questions patients have in regards to Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass surgery include, “Where are incisions placed for a Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass procedure?”, “What are some variations to the common Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass method?” and “What are some of the risks associated with Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass?” If you’d like to know how these questions pertain to your specific medical situation, the best way to start is to contact a cosmetic surgeon for a consultation and evaluation.

Roux-en-y (RNY) Gastric Bypass Surgery Preparation and Recovery

As you move further in your research regarding Roux-en-y (RNY) gastric bypass surgery, you’ll need to understand what’s involved with your preparation for and your recovery from this procedure. Examples of questions often asked in relation to the surgery include, “What steps should I take to prepare for surgery?”, “What can I expect the day of surgery to be like?”, “How will I look and feel immediately following the surgery?”, “When can I pursue my normal activities again?” and “How long can I expect results to last?” Answers to each of these questions are provided below.

What steps should I take to prepare for surgery?
Your preparatory steps for this surgery will be plotted out by you and your doctor together. Generally speaking, these steps include making sure that all the surrounding details of the surgery are properly handled, including making sure that you’ve provided yourself with enough time for recovery and that you’re ready to undertake the after-care program with vigor and enthusiasm.

What can I expect the day of surgery to be like?
You can expect the day of your surgery to progress quickly – it will seem like a whirlwind of activity, and it will be over before you know it. You should also be prepared to experience several conflicting emotions, including fear, anxiety, excitement and happiness. These are all normal emotions, and knowing ahead of time that you’ll be feeling them will help you move through the day smoothly.

How will I look and feel immediately following the surgery?
Immediately after the surgery, you’ll feel confused and groggy, as you’ll be recovering from the effects of general anesthesia. After you’re fully awake, you will feel sore and somewhat numb in the areas surrounding your incision. You will look somewhat better, but the overall lasting effects of this surgery will take time to achieve, and you need to be prepared for that fact in order to avoid disappointment.

When can I pursue my normal activities again?
You should expect to remain in the hospital for a few days after your surgery, but this hospital stay is merely precautionary in nature. After you’re released, you’ll need a few weeks at a minimum to get back into your routine.

How long can I expect results to last?
This surgery should be seen as a starting rather than a finishing point in your fight against obesity. Therefore, you need to be ready, willing and able to continue with the after-care requirements that include dietary and exercise components in order to provide yourself with all the benefits that this surgery provides. Patients who have maintained their discipline most often report a lifetime of positive results and benefits.

Overall, examples of questions regarding this surgery include, “What steps should I take to prepare for surgery?”, “What can I expect the day of surgery to be like?”, “How will I look and feel immediately following the surgery?”, “When can I pursue my normal activities again?” and “How long can I expect results to last?” For specific answers regarding each of these questions, you should contact a medical professional right away for a full and complete consultation.